Scrum101 … an intensive online introduction to Scrum

A scene from the Scrum 101 introductory video.

A scene from the Scrum 101 introductory video.

Scrum101 is a side project that I’ve been working on and off for over a year. It started as some experiments in video, because I wanted to learn how my live course material would translate into video and if there was something that I could do with that. The vision I had when I started was ‘ … a simple online introduction to Scrum.’

So, I did some recording and put it out on youtube. My first steps with video were very raw and it was a big learning curve, and the feedback was particularly awful! There was a common complaint the audio track was much to quiet so I re-recorded all the audio tracks, re-edited the videos and wrote up an introductory description to each of the different topics. I eventually ended up with 9 videos covering different topics within Scrum including a quick overview of the Scrum process, the roles and responsibilities in Scrum,

Once I’d completed the videos and descriptions, I needed some place to put all this. I didn’t really want to put here, on my main business blog so I had to find or create a website to host it. I obtained the Scrum101.com domain, slapped WordPress on the site, and moved all the content over.

A scene from the Product Backlog video.

A scene from the Product Backlog video.

While creating Scrum101.com I learnt some really important lessons. Lessons I would not have learnt, nor appreciated, any other way. Video is a medium that is hard to produce because it’s very time consuming. The creation of the content is only the start of the process. Recording, adding an audio track and editing are all important steps and each requires it’s own set of skills and specialized knowledge.

If that seems like a lot of work … well, it was!

I estimate that I’ve spent about 20 hours per video preparing, editing, recording the audio and then re-recording the audio. And there were 9 videos in total. I also spend another 50 hours creating the website, and writing the introductory content for each of the videos. It’s been quite a journey.

Scrum101.com went live at the end of June 2012, and it’s been working quite nicely since then … over 200 people have already completed the course, and it’s received very positive feedback.

What is Scrum101?

A scene from the Product Burndown video.

A scene from the Product Burndown video.

Scrum101 has morphed from my original concept of ‘ … a simple online introduction to Scrum’ into something much more comprehensive. Let me describe how it works … Scrum101 is a combination of email newsletter, blog articles and video. When you signup for Scrum101, you’ll receive and email every day for 10 working days. The reason I use email is because it’s the only reliable way that I can prompt you on a daily basis.

So everyday you’re receive an email that discusses a different Scrum topic, and a link to a video on that topic. The email provides you with some initial context, and the video explains the topic. There is material within the email that is not fully discussed in the video (and vice versa) so the two are complimentary. Each of the videos is only short and less than 5 minutes [except the final video which is just under 15 minutes in duration.]

When you signup  you’ll be exposed to a two week online course on Scrum and each day you’ll be prompted to spend 10 minutes (or less) familiarising yourself with a topic in Scrum. The topics discussed include:

– And intro to the Scrum process,
– Scrum roles and responsibilities,
– Sprint burndown charts,
– Product burndown charts,
– Taskboards,
– the Product Backlog, and more.

I’ve ended up with something much more than my initial vision. Scrum101.com is an intensive online course to familiarise you with the vocabulary, ideas and approaches used in the Scrum community, so that when you use Scrum (or take a course) those ideas are immediately apparent to you and allow you to take it to the next level.

Scrum 101 is now live and you can signup on the home page: http://scrum101.com

Here’s what some people have been saying

@ScrumZen: Scrum101.com is a great service to agile industry. Hats off to Kane Mar 
@DeveloperWarren: thanks for http://scrum101.com. Enjoying the 2 week intro already!

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8 Responses to Scrum101 … an intensive online introduction to Scrum

  1. @ArthurSKM January 26, 2013 at 6:04 am #

    Alles wat je altijd al had willen weten over Scrum, maar nooit durfde te vragen… http://t.co/0ZLGGYd0 #scrum #agile

  2. @ivyclark January 25, 2013 at 2:03 pm #

    “@scrumology: Scrum 101 … an intensive online introduction to Scrum http://t.co/8qNKGeCB #Scrum #Agile” @ocean @JonathanStrahan

  3. @JasonClint January 24, 2013 at 4:39 pm #

    “@scrumology: Scrum 101 … an intensive online introduction to Scrum http://t.co/HsFPw07o #Scrum #Agile” // @mentalsmith

  4. @MarcoPeschiera January 24, 2013 at 11:30 am #

    “@scrumology: Scrum 101 … an intensive online introduction to Scrum http://t.co/IoyW5uL4 #Scrum #Agile” // this is pretty neat

  5. @AgileCarnival January 24, 2013 at 8:13 am #

    Scrum 101 … an intensive online introduction to Scrum http://t.co/y9B4Tf4B #Scrum #Agile

  6. @scrumology January 24, 2013 at 8:13 am #

    Scrum 101 … an intensive online introduction to Scrum http://t.co/r4SIaHmZ #Scrum #Agile

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